Responsibility

Sustainability - Responsibility

After the findings of the causes of Global Ozone depletion, the AMA, with the full co-operation of the South African Aerosol Industry, has committed itself to complying with and assisting the authorities with regulations/restrictions on the use of ODS's (Ozone Depleting Substances) in the manufacture of its products. Today it has all but eliminated these products from cosumer aerosol products in South Africa.


It also takes congniscence of, and fully cooperates with local and global initiatives to reduce/minimise industrys' contribution to other negative issues such as Global Warming and VOC's (Volatile Organic Compounds).


The AMA's programme to reduce the industry's Carbon Footprint and to ensure a more sustainable environment is based on 4 pillars which are:

  • Manufacturing
  • Market place
  • Community
  • Environment

background recycling figures

MEDIA RELEASE
 
Pretoria school honoured for aerosol recycling initiative 
 
IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 08 October 2013
 
You’ve got to reduce, reuse and recycle every day. That is the message that was chanted passionately by the Silverton Primary School learners yesterday, 07 October 2013 as they received the Aerosol Recycling Initiative (ARI) Gold Can Award at their school in Pretoria.
 
The Aerosol Manufacturers’ Association (AMA) of Southern Africa honoured Silverton Primary yesterday, 07 October 2013 for its contribution, passion and commitment to the Aerosol Recycling Initiative (ARI) by awarding the school with the flagship Gold Can Award.
 
“Research shows that many people are unaware that aerosol cans are 100% recyclable,” says Mr Philip Cloete, Chairman of AMA of Southern Africa. “We recognised the importance and accepted the responsibility to create awareness about the recycling qualities of these cans.”
 
As part of this recycling initiative, AMA partnered with Silverton Primary School to develop a catchy song and music video to help teach youngsters about the importance of recycling and the impact it can have on the environment. 
 
The music video on YouTube that is used to create awareness and encourage aerosol can recycling amongst Silverton Primary School learners and ultimately amongst schools across South Africa, has received a remarkable following from learners.
 
Silverton Primary School has been recycling all of its outdated textbooks and all scrap paper generated at the school for the past couple of years and plans to implement a recycling centre for all major waste streams, including can recycling, in 2014.
 
“We got involved in the project as a way to educate our learners about the role each of us has to play in our communities to spearhead recycling and to spread the message,” says Mr Lou de Vos, Vice Principal of Silverton Primary School. “We are proud to be part of this worthy initiative and look forward to sharing this message and inspiring more schools and learners across South Africa to get involved.”
 
The enthusiasm of the students has led to the ARI Golden Can Awards being considered for a national schools campaign by AMA. 
 
If you would like more information about AMA or ARI, please contact AMA on 011-440-8704 | 083-325-9704 or visit www.aerosol.co.za
 
 
Silverton, Pretoria: You’ve got to reduce, reuse and recycle every day. That is the message that was chanted passionately by the Silverton Primary School learners yesterday, 07 October 2013 as they received the Aerosol Recycling Initiative (ARI) Gold Can Award at their school in Pretoria.
 
(Photo left) The Aerosol Manufacturers’ Association (AMA) of Southern Africa partnered with Silverton Primary School to develop a catchy song and music video to help teach youngsters about the importance of recycling and the impact it can have on the environment.
 
(Photo right) Thoriso Maseko, Mbalenhle Masilo, Yolani Sishuba and Nikita Nolan played the main roles in the ARI music video.
 
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Released by Reputation Matters
 Media contact: 
Annette Jansen van Rensburg
082-773-2948
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
 
 
MORE ABOUT AEROSOL MANUFACTURERS’ ASSOCIATION (AMA)
 
Aerosol Manufacturers’ Association (AMA) is the "voice" of the South African Aerosol Industry and acts on behalf of the industry on a variety of issues, from legislation to the setting of national standards. 
 
It is also a founder member of the International Aerosol Liaison Committee, a forum made up of approximately 30 countries, (including the USA, Europe, South America, Australia, China and India) who meet annually to exchange views, assess standards and compare notes on developments on various issues relevant to the aerosol industry.            
 
 
 

Globally, the majority of aerosol cans are manufactured from tin-plated steel or aluminium and are fully recyclable with similar other products such as food and beverage cans. 

Steel and aluminium products are highly sought after by collectors and ultimately by the recycling organisations such as Collect a Can, resulting in them being the most recycled material, surpassing by far, glass, plastic, cardboard and other recyclable products.

Read more: Recycling of Aerosols

Original AMA Sustainability Work Group Stakeholders that contributed/participated in the BMI Aerosol Recycling Survey 2011

AMA Sustainability Work Group

South African Aerosol Recycling Market Assessment

Commissioned Report

November 2011 Samantha Mpofu

Recommendations

South Africa still lags behind the developed world when it comes to the recycling of aerosol cans. When asked whether they thought the collection of aerosol cans was effective in South Africa, the majority of the respondents mentioned that they did not think that this was the case and that there was still a lot to be done. Below are some strategies mentioned by respondents as well information gathered through desk research to increase the recycling rate of aerosol cans.

  • Consumer Education
    • Consumers need to be educated on how to handle aerosol can waste. They should make sure that aerosols are completely empty before they throw them away. If the can has labels, these should not be removed as these help identify the substances in the can.
    • Consumers should not pierce, crush or flatten the aerosol before disposing them, they should also detach any loose or easily removable parts, such as the lid, and dispose of them with the rest of your rubbish
    • Never throw aerosol cans in roadside dumps or trash fires as the cans are still pressurized and can explode
  • Introduction of more waste collection sites for cans to be recovered before they reach landfills
    • Introduction of more waste banks where consumers can dispose of their waste with clearly marked bins for aerosol cans so these are collected separately
    • Introducing waste bins at residential complexes where consumers can easily throw away waste in marked bins instead of having to travel with waste in their cars, to the nearest collection point
  • Joint efforts amongst key industry stake holders in the collection and recycling of aerosol cans
    • According to recycling international, a two-year partnership between Unilever’s deodorants team and Alupro, the UK aluminium packaging recycling organisation, has boosted the number of local authorities collecting aerosol cans from 67% to 81%, bringing kerbside collection to an additional 4 million households.
    • A joint nationwide promotion between Unilever’s Sure deodorant and major supermarket chain Tesco resulted in a 30% increase in recycling rates in participating stores.
    • In the UK, the British Aerosol Manufacturers Association (BAMA) engaged the local municipalities in their recycling efforts.
  • Sorting waste at source, although taking away the livelihoods of collectors has to be considered
  • More investment in state of the art aerosol can recycling equipment and opening up more recycling facilities that can handle aerosol cans
  • Research into other packaging alternatives for aerosol can products
  • Work on changing perceptions held by some environmental awareness organisations in South Africa that aerosol cans can not be recycled or disposed of safely
  • Establish an industry wide initiative to provide accurate information on the aerosol can volume collected and recycled

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