Labelling

Trade Metrology Labelling Requirements
Further to those labelling requirements prescribed in terms of the different Acts under which specific products are administered, the labelling of aerosol products is also prescribed in terms of the Trade Metrology Act, Act No 77 of 1973. Read more...

Hazard Labelling Requirements

Aerosols are clearly defined as dangerous goods for purposes of transportation and are also clearly dangerous goods from a perspective of handling and storage. At present there is no prescribed system according to which the handling and storage danger of aerosol products must be presented on the label.

There are two SANS standards for the labelling of such products:

a) SANS 10265 The Classification and Labelling of Dangerous Substances and Preparations for Sale and Handling; and
(a derivation of the EU Dangerous Preparations Directive)
b) SANS 10234 Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)
(a new internationally developed labelling standard).

SANS 10234 Read more...

It is the intention of Government that the dangerous goods labelling will be in terms of SANS 10234:2008 – Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) as required by new regulations to be promulgated under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, Act No. 85 of 1993. In addition, various other draft regulations, e.g. waste and environmental health, refer to SANS 10234 for deciding whether a product is hazardous for purposes of disposal or safe use. SANS 10234 is therefore recommended as the basis for product labelling wherever possible, i.e. the appropriate information is available for classifying the product.

The prescriptions of SANS 10234 are not applicable to medicines, food additives, cosmetics, and pesticide residues.

As SANS 10234 is not applicable to these types of products, the Aerosol Manufacturers’ Association recommends minimum label requirements for these products. (Link to relevant part of AMA Code of Practice)

In terms of SANS 10234, an aerosol product must be classified as one of Extremely Flammable, Flammable or Non-flammable, as well as being classified as a gas under pressure.

The minimum labelling for each class of aerosol is given below.

Extremely Flammable Aerosol

ghs_flammable_symbolghs_compressed_gas_symbol
Danger
Extremely flammable aerosol
Keep away from heat/sparks/open flames/hot surfaces* – No smoking
* (manufacturer to specify applicable ignition sources)
Do not spray on an open flame or other ignition source
Pressurized container: Do not pierce or burn, even after use
Protect from sunlight and do not expose to temperatures exceeding 50 °C

Flammable Aerosol

ghs_flammable_symbolghs_compressed_gas_symbol
Warning
Flammable aerosol
Keep away from heat/sparks/open flames/hot surfaces* – No smoking
* (manufacturer to specify applicable ignition sources)
Do not spray on an open flame or other ignition source
Pressurized container: Do not pierce or burn, even after use
Protect from sunlight and do not expose to temperatures exceeding 50 °C

Non-flammable Aerosol

ghs_compressed_gas_symbol

Warning
Contains gas under pressure; may explode if heated
Protect from sunlight and store in a well-ventilated place

NOTE: The wording above may not be altered in any way (even if the meaning is retained)!

In addition, the aerosol product must also be assessed for classification for any other physical, health or environmental hazard. If the aerosol is classified for any additional hazard, it will need to carry the symbols(s), signal word(s), hazard statements and precautionary statements appropriate for the additional hazard classifications.

SANS 10265 Read more...

The label of an aerosol dispenser shall contain the following information in indelible, easily legible lettering:

a) the name and address or trademark of the company responsible for marketing the product;
b) the net contents;
c) directions for use;
d) the danger symbol(s); and
120px-hazard_f_svg
e) the declaration "CFC FREE" plus logo, if applicable.

In addition these requirements, the label of an aerosol dispenser shall bear the following warnings, regardless of the contents.

General warnings:

a) Flammable (if applicable);
b) Pressurized container- (protect from sunlight and) do not expose to temperatures exceeding 50 °C;
c) Do not pierce (puncture) or burn (incinerate), even when empty;
d) Keep out of reach of children (even when empty);
e) Do not spray near naked flame (or incandescent material);
f) Keep away from source of ignition - no smoking. Use in a well-ventilated environment; and
g) Use only as directed.
NOTE: Expressions in parenthesis are optional.

In addition, for hairsprays:

Do not spray near, or place can on, polished (painted or plastics) surfaces.

In addition, for oven cleaners and other corrosive products:

a) TOXIC - contains caustic soda;
NOTE: If the caustic soda content is equal to or exceeds 5 % (by mass).
b) Avoid (prolonged) contact with skin;
c) In the event of contact with eyes or skin, immediately wash out with water and seek medical advice; and
d) Avoid inhalation of caustic vapours.
NOTE: If this is not declared elsewhere.

AMA Recommendations

In addition to any mandatory labelling requirements as identified above, all aerosols must carry clear identification, instructions and recommendations regarding the safe and efficient use of the product.
The label should be in at least one official language (except where specific regulations require otherwise). The use of English is most common as the language of choice for product labelling.

The can must also contain the following details that should be in indelible, easily legible lettering:

a)

the name and address or trademark of the company responsible for marketing the product;
b) each aerosol can should be batch marked (compulsory for medicinal and pesticide products) in order to facilitate a product recall should this become necessary;
c) “AMA Approved” logo in accordance with the conditions placed on its use by the AMA;
d) where applicable , the declaration “CFC Free” (or equivalent) and plus logo if so desired; and
e) the appropriate recycling logo according to the material from which the aerosol can is manufactured;
f) the appropriate hazard logos and warning statements according to either SANS 10265 or SANS 10234.

In addition, for those aerosol products which do not fall under the scope of SANS 10234, the AMA would recommend that the same labelling with regard to flammability as required by SANS 10234 should be used in order that a consistent message can be conveyed to consumers for all aerosols.

Note: International standards do change from time to time, so it is therefore likely that changes to the AMA recommendations may occur from time to time.

Barcoding

All the distribution channels manage their stocks by mean of barcodes on each individual product as well as each shrinkwrap units and case. All locally produced aerosols should have a GS1 System barcode that meets the requirements of the GS1 General Specifications.

GS1 South Africa can be contacted at:
Tel: (011) 789 5777
Fax: (011) 919 0064
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website: www.GS1za.org

Postal:
GS1 South Africa
P O Box 41417
Craighall
2024

Imported aerosols should have either a GS1 System barcode from the country of origin or an UPC number that can be scanned by the point-of-sale scanners.

Aerosols that are locally manufactured for export to Canada or the USA must have an UPC number that can be obtained via GS1 South Africa.

Shrink-wrap codes must comply with GS1 South Africa recommendations. Outer case coding (IT symbology) is also regulated by GS1 South Africa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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